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Thursday, February 23, 2006

Health, United States, 2005

List of Chartbook Figures
Population
1. Total population and older population: United States, 1950–2050


2. Percent of population in five age groups: United States, 1950, 2004, and 2050

3. Percent of population in selected race and Hispanic origin groups by age: United States, 1980–2004


4. Poverty by age: United States, 1966–2003



5. Low income by age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2003



Health Insurance and Expenditures
6. Health insurance coverage among persons under 65 years of age: United States, 1984–2003


7. No health insurance coverage among persons under 65 years of age by selected characteristics: United States, 2003


8. National health expenditures as a percent of Gross Domestic Product: United States, 1960–2003


9. Personal health care expenditures according to source of funds and type of expenditures: United States, 2003


Health Risk Factors
10. Cigarette smoking among men, women, high school students, and mothers during pregnancy: United States, 1965–2003


11. Current and frequent cigarette smoking among high school students by sex, race and Hispanic origin, and grade level: United States, 2003


12. Seatbelt use and drinking and driving among high school students by sex: United States, 1991–2003


13. High school students engaging in regular physical activity by sex, race and Hispanic origin, and grade: United States, 2003


14. Leisure-time physical activity among adults 18 years of age and over by poverty status: United States, 2003


15. Overweight and obesity by age: United States, 1960–2002


Morbidity and Limitation of Activity
16. Asthma attack among children by age, race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1998–2003


17. Adults 18 years of age and over with severe headache or migraine or low back pain in the past 3 months by age and sex: United States, 2003


18. Selected chronic health conditions causing limitation of activity among children by age: United States, 2002–03


19. Selected chronic health conditions causing limitation of activity among working-age adults by age: United States, 2002–03


20. Selected chronic health conditions causing limitation of activity among older adults by age: United States, 2002–03


Health Care Utilization
21. Use of mammography within the past 2 years for women 40 years of age and over by race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1987–2003


22. Use of Pap smear within the past 3 years for women 18 years of age and over by race and Hispanic origin: United States, 1987–2003


23. Injury-related visits to hospital emergency departments in children under 20 years of age by first-listed external cause and age: United States,
average annual 2000–2003


24. Visits to physician offices and hospital outpatient departments by sex and age: United States, 1996–2003


25. Hospital inpatient procedures for insertion of coronary artery stent(s) among adults 45 years of age and over by age: United States, 1996–2003


Mortality
26. Life expectancy at birth and at 65 years of age by sex: United States, 1900–1902 through 2002


27. Infant, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates: United States, 1950–2002


28. Infant mortality rates by detailed race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, 2000–2002


29. Death rates for leading causes of death for all ages: United States, 1950–2002

Special Feature: Adults 55–64 Years of Age
30. Aging of the population 45 years of age and over: United States, 2004, 2014, and 2024


31. Employment status among adults 55-64 years of age by sex, race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2002–03


32. Low income among adults 55–64 years of age by sex, race and Hispanic origin: United States, 2003


33. Health insurance coverage among adults 55–64 years of age by marital status: United States, 2002–03


34. Cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity, and high cholesterol) among adults 55–64 years of age: United States, 1988–94 and 1999–2002


35. Visits to health professionals in the past 12 months among adults 55–64 years of age by health insurance status: United States, 2002–03


36. Blood glucose regulators and cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed during medical visits among adults 55–64 years of age by sex: United States, 1995–96 and 2002–03


37. Total prescribed medicine expense per person per year among adults 55–64 years of age by source of payment and sex: United States, 1997 and 2002.

1 comment:

Gene Prescott said...

Age
From 1950 to 2004 the total resident population of the United States increased from 150 million to 294 million, representing an average annual growth rate of 1 percent (figure 1). During the same period, the population 65 years of age and over grew twice as rapidly and increased from 12 to 36 million
persons. The population 75 years of age and over grew 2.9 times as quickly as the total population, increasing from 4 to 18 million persons. Projections indicate that the rate of
population growth from now to 2050 will be slower for all age groups, and older age groups will continue to grow more than twice as rapidly as the total population. Between 1950 and 2004, the U.S. population grew older
(figure 2). From 1950 to 2004 the population under 18 years of age fell from 31 to 25 percent of the total population, while persons 55–64 years increased from 9 to 10 percent of total persons, persons 65–74 years remained at about 6 percent, and persons 75 years and over increased from 3 to 6 percent of the total.
From 2004 to 2050 it is anticipated that the percent of the population 55 years and over will increase substantially. The population age 55–64 years of age, featured in this
chartbook, is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the adult population during the next 10 years (figure 30). In future decades both the population age 55–64 and the
population age 65 years and over will increase dramatically as the baby boomers, born in the post-World War II period of 1946 through 1964, age. By 2029, all of the baby boomers will be age 65 and over. Between 2004 and 2050 the population 65–74 years of age will increase from 6 to 9 percent of the total and the population 75 years and over will increase from 6 to 12 percent. By 2040 the population 75 years and over will exceed the population 65–74 years of age. The aging of the population has important consequences for the health care system (1,2). As the older fraction of the population increases, more services will be required for the treatment and management of chronic and acute health conditions. Providing
health care services needed by Americans of all ages will be a major challenge in the 21st century. Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans Health, United States, 2005 21 Population